Kari Jobe on Helping People Connect to God, 'I'm Just Being Obedient to Fulfill the Calling I Have on My Life' (Interview Part 2)

Justin SarachikFeb 19, 2014 09:55 AM EST

Kari Jobe had a chat with BreatheCast about her thoughts on this year's Grammy Awards, being a light in the dark, and finding God's calling of obedience in her life and sticking to His "faithful" plan.

Jobe has become a prominent voice for worship in Christian music and is using her talents as a songwriter and passionate singer to spread the gospel of Jesus. She also knows that with her role as a leader and as someone with a platform to be an example toward Christ, it is important to exemplify that standard.

"I believe there are people connected to our obedience in our lives, and I'm just being obedient to fulfill the calling I have on my life and I'm passionate about it and it's helping people connect with God and I couldn't ask for anything better," Jobe said to BreatheCast.

When questioned on the backlash Natalie Grant received for her comments concerning leaving the Grammy Awards early because of certain events not agreeing with her faith, Jobe stuck to the same mantra despite admit-tingly not knowing of the controversy.

"We are all going to be in places that we feel are dark. You can walk into a restaurant and feel darkness, or airport, whatever. We live in a fallen world and thankfully we have the spirit of God living inside of us to be protected," she said. "I don't blame her for leaving. I mean I fast forwarded things, so to get up and leave is probably the same sort of idea."

Jobe was aware of singer Mandisa's decision not to go to the Grammy's because it put her in line with temptations and in an atmosphere she did not want to be in. Jobe respected the decision of both ladies.

"I honor them for it. i think it's important to guard our hears, our minds, and ears spiritually. When you are in a room, and clearly the presence of God is not welcome there, I would probably say I would get up and leave as well. I love the presence of God so much I feel it is worth protecting. It's not worth grieving the Holy Spirit over."

Jobe mentioned that she watched the Grammy's and enjoys music outside of the worship realm. She appreciated the performances by Pink and John Legend the most because the artist's used their natural singing talent without crazy gimmicks and huge stage productions.

When asked how the Dove Awards or the K-Love Awards stack up next to the Grammy's. Jobe mentioned they were shows to "celebrate with each other" because of God's calling on their lives.

"Of course the Grammy's are always fun to watch and we get to see certain genres of music that we like and connect. I like that the K-Love Awards and the Dove Awards are more about the presence of God, and even in this last year, they felt more worshipful than I remember in years past. The atmosphere of the other shows are a lot more God centered and sweet," said Jobe.

Referring to the Grammy Awards, "I have to fast forward through so many things on the Grammy's because that's like, 'Woah' because I don't like it or it seems dark, not everything, but some of the things are awesome. But it's also good to be real and watch those things because so many people connect with that music and I would say that people connect with things that are real, and give them things that are inspiring hope. Songs about hope and love people are always going to connect with."

With secular music on topic, Jobe said it is not hard for her to be a Christian artist because her peers are all doing the same thing as her. She admitted it becomes more difficult to share the gospel and her beliefs when the situation does arise outside of the comforts of church or a concert.

"I don't think it's hard at all. It might be harder if I was in non-Christian circles a lot, you know where I'd have to defend my faith. There are times when I have to explain that, like on the airplane, or someone who doesnt listen to Christian music, or they are jaded by the church. That's when it's hard. When sit there and say, 'God is faithful' and they are like, 'I don't see that, he hasn't been faithful to me,'" she explained. "It's then that it's hard to answer and all I have to say is well, 'Give him another chance because he healed my life. I chose forgiveness and I chose to press in to who he is.' That's probably when it's most hard, but usually in the circles I'm in, we all do worship and Christian music."

Jobe then shared one of her favorite testimonies on how God changed someone's life through her music.

"My newest favorite is about a motorcycle dude. He rides in a bike club and he was on YouTube and found my music. He used to go to church but he got jaded by church. He wrote in and said, 'You have a grown man, a biker man in his leather and I'm crying because I feel the presence of God in my house and just wanted to thank you for being a godly woman and leading worship the way that you do.' I thought that was really cool," she said.

As far as what is in store next for Jobe, she is going to head out on tour with Rend Collective and promote her new album Majestic. After that, she will continue on to play a few summer festivals and begin planning the fall leg of the tour.

"My brother is getting married too, never a dull moment," she concluded.

 Majestic releases on March 25, and her tour starts on Feb. 27.

Read the first part of the interview here.

Don't miss

Today's playlist

In the SPOTLIGHT